Did you know Midwives are skilled practioners who provide prenatal care, support during labour and birth and 6 weeks after the birth for mom and baby. Midwives listen, observe, educate, guide and care.

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FAQ

Do I have to pay for midwifery care?
Do I need a referral?
How do I know if I qualify for midwifery care?
Can I have a Midwife and a Doctor?
Will you share details of my pregnancy with my family doctor?
How often do I see a midwife?
What kind of tests can a midwife order?
Do I have to have my baby at home?
What happens if something goes wrong?
Does having a midwife mean I can’t take anything for pain?
Where do midwife appointments take place?

Do I have to pay for midwifery care?
No, Midwifery care is completely covered by the Ministry of Health and Long term Care, even if you do not have OHIP

Do I need a referral?
No, you simply call the office or book online to make an appointment.

How do I know if I qualify for midwifery care?
Most women qualify for midwifery care. If you are not sure whether you do, we can determine if you do when you come in for your first information session with the midwife

Can I have a Midwife and a Doctor?
You can have either a midwife or a doctor for your pregnancy, birth and newborn care. Midwives, obstetricians and family physicians are all primary care providers. A primary care provider takes sole responsibility for your care. In rare circumstances a woman’s care may need to be transferred to an obstetrician. In this situation the midwife may provide supportive care.

Will you share details of my pregnancy with my family doctor?
We will inform your doctor of any details you wish to have shared with them. No details will be shared without your consent.

How often do I see a midwife?
We see you prenatally once a month until 28 weeks gestation, biweekly until 36 weeks gestation and weekly until you have your baby.

What kind of tests can a midwife order?
There are a wide range of tests that a midwife can order. For example, she can arrange for appropriate ultrasound and genetic screening, as well as standard laboratory and diagnostic tests. Urine and blood work are typically done right at the midwife’s office.

Do I have to have my baby at home?
No, you decide where you want to have your baby. Although midwives are the only profession to provide home birth as a safe option, we are equally trained to manage hospital births.

What happens if something goes wrong?
If, during midwifery care or labour, a health concern should arise that is beyond the scope of midwifery practice, (the midwife will use emergency measures within the scope of her practice if the need arises) your midwife will consult with the appropriate health care professional. Occasionally, this may result in a transfer of your care to an obstetrician or, for your baby, to a pediatrician. If your care is transferred, your midwife may remain with you in a supportive role. (The midwife will use emergency measures within the scope of her practice if the need arises)

Does having a midwife mean I can’t take anything for pain?
No, although many midwifery clients deliver without drugs due o the extra support we provide, you still have the same options for pain relief in labour as you would with a doctor.

Where do midwife appointments take place?
The majority of your appointments (with the exception of delivery, as well as a small number of home visits in the days after your baby is born) will take place in our office, unless your midwife determines it is necessary to make other arrangements with you